iOS vs Android

Since people talking about android vs iOS in here, decide to make a separate topic for it

fun fact: Many major components of Apple’s current operating systems (iOS, macOS, watchOS, tvOS) are actually open source. In fact, Apple contributes a lot of effort to many open source projects used in other operating systems: Open Source - Apple Developer

What pixel are you referring to (Pixel 4 and below seems to be reached EOL)? Further, is they even an android device that got major OS versions for 5 years. iPhone 8 which released 5 years ago still get the latest iOS update. Apple also released an update 2 months ago for older iPhone 6S (2015) and newer and iPad Air 2 (2014) and newer, a zero-day patch(not the first time).

Kinda off topic but, android is a fragmented mess(due to many custom roms). Today, over 80% of iOS users are running the latest OS. On Android, that’s just now hitting 13%. The majority of Android users are running out dated code. Also doesn’t custom ROM like GrapheneOS and DivestOS lag behind android. Isn’t it better to use the default android version in Pixel(in terms of security)?

Important to note that I am not up-to-date with android stuff

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Good points, as far as I’m aware the Graphene devs do a very good job of keeping up with the latest Android updates. But yeah I think a lot of custom Android OS’s (technically ROM is an inaccurate term) lag behind the latest Android a bit.

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Assuming GrapheneOS team is similar Brave team where they able to keep up with chromium, this seems like not a concern (this is a bit concerning, however I am unfamiliar with the situation).

Oh, ok, that make sense since ROM stand for read-only-memory. Is it something similar to distros in the linux world?

I am also curious how custom android OS work with project mainline introduced by google. Since it offers, security update independent of the android version.

Here are dates of when Google and some aftermarket systems publish the monthly security updates (ASB) and Chromium updates:

It doesn’t take into account everything, for example GrapheneOS often ships newer versions of components such as the kernel and drivers (eg. Mali) than Google does.
Another one: Google typically does Chrome updates in staged rollouts and both GrapheneOS and my DivestOS often release to users faster.

See also this overview: Patch Levels - DivestOS Mobile

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It is also interesting that DivestOS recommend GrapheneOS.

Does DivestOS make my device secure?
The short answer: No.
The long answer is that DivestOS is likely the best harm reduction option if your device is no longer in support by its manufacturer or vendor.
Any project or product claiming they make end-of-life devices secure should be rigorously scrutinized.
If you want a reasonably secure and well-maintained device, please acquire a newer Pixel (6/6a/7) that is fully supported by GrapheneOS and use it instead.
Lastly it must be noted that privacy and security go hand-in-hand, there is a fundamental limit of how much privacy you can achieve if you do not have security backing it up.

So is DivestOS for EoL pixels?

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DivestOS supports a wide variety of devices, and provides better security than the stock OS in most cases, but not the more advanced level of security provided by projects like GrapheneOS.

Oh ok.
I have also been seeing e-os time to time. How this compare to DivestOS since they supports a wide variety of devices.

I am also curious about how the app compatibility looks like in android forks like grapheneOS.
As an average user, tend to use banking apps or PayPal that relies on Google Play Services.

This was already covered in my above links.

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GrapheneOS has Play Services. The only things that don’t work, as far as I know, are:

  1. Some banking apps (because GOS fails Safety Net)
  2. Android Auto

Compatibility, therefore, is in the 99.5%+ range.

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You created multiple thread advocating for apple while unneccessarily bashing Graphene OS at the same time. Coincidence? Dont you think one thread is enough? No offence, seems to me like concern troll.

Edit: due to being flagged I apologize if the above phrasing of words sounds offending in any way but due to forums and groups often being infiltrated by trolls or users acting in bad faith Im a bit concerned about the intention of this user. He also made a post rn about Google providing e2e for their webmails even when Google holds a master key.

I did not bash GOS. I think it is fair to be concern as many notable sources like techlore question the support & security of GOS and android forks in general. Further, by the removal of bromite in PG as it was unable to keep up with upstream.

Also, avoid criticising me (as you seems to do in multiple topics), if you think my ideas are disagreeable criticise them instead.

Bromite doesnt have anything to do with GOS.

The default browser there is Vanadium. Please inform yourself correctly before making statements about such sensitive privacy topics.

I didnt watch Techlores video about GOS yet but its from 3 years agon where many feature like the playservices compatibility werent implemented yet.

I know there was also some beef going on between the Calyx OS community and the GOS one where he did a video about a while ago but this hasnt anything to do with the qualitiy of the OS itself.

That is not the point. Bromite which was recommended by PG was removed due to it being unable to keep up with the chromium upstream. Bromite lag behind updates making it not secure a browser.
Same thing could happen with GOS (or any android fork). It might be a matter of when, not how.

Yes, FOSS shouldn’t have those issues. This video too:

Well we go by their track record, which GOS has an excellent track record. I don’t expect them to fall behind on updates.

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Same thing could happen with GOS (or any android fork)

The same can happen with every software.

Theres literally no hint or evidence suggesting this being a possibility for GOS.

The guy in the bottom video explains that this move is primarily motivated because he’s becoming a somewhat high profile individual who is more likely to be the focus of attacks, which is nonsense, being a semi-popular privacy YouTuber doesn’t make you a high profile target.
He doesnt talk about GOS at all. Also keep in mind, there was some conflict between techlore, calyx and graphene

GrapheneOS allows to use Google’s Advanced Protection Program with Sandboxed Play Services. It provides security updates very fast, sometimes even faster than stock. And you get all the privacy features and security hardening on top

The OS has an excellent track record, contrary to Apple, Edward Snowden uses it.

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I don’t think any ROM can push out updates before stock as Google releases the update as soon as it’s ready. There is no way any third-party could get the code to push that update earlier.

They use GKIs (generic Kernel Images)

It actually is possible, because Google does staged rollouts where only so many % of users receive the update over the first few days, in case of a bad update.

For example: Google Pixel Update - December 2022 - Google Pixel Community

We have provided the monthly software update for December 2022. All supported Pixel devices running Android 13 will receive these software updates starting today. The rollout will continue over the next week in phases depending on carrier and device.

That’s interesting. I had heard of the term “rollout” but didn’t fully understand it and didn’t know it applied to security updates too.

Surely the rollout won’t take very long though, so GOS users would only get it a few days early?